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Facebook Hacked

Discussion in 'Social Media' started by Graybeard, Sep 28, 2018.

  1. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    Facebook security breach allowed hackers to control the accounts of up to 50 million users

    Facebook security breach allowed hackers to control the accounts of up to 50 million users
    • Facebook discovered a security issue that allowed hackers to access information that could have let them take over around 50 million accounts, the company announced on Friday.
    • Following the disclosure, shares of Facebook extended losses in midday trading.

    No mia culpa -- the hackers did it with my name ;)

    lololoz
     
    KG, tyoussef and VirtualGlobalPhone like this.
  2. Golden Goose
  3. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    Looks like it's time to buy the dip!
     
    KG likes this.
  4. affmarketer101

    affmarketer101 Affiliate affiliate

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    Perhaps a "fake" attack will help Facebook offer premium paid feature in near future. :D
     
    tyoussef likes this.
  5. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    The Zuck *False Flag* operation?
    Sounds like a CS (conspiracy story) :D
    Demand punitive damages! Sue them ...
     
  6. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    Facebook’s stunning disclosure of a massive hack on Friday in which attackers gained access tokens to at least 50 million accounts—bypassing security measures and potentially giving them full control of both profiles and linked apps—has already stirred the threat of a $1.63 billion dollar fine in the European Union, according to the Wall Street Journal.
    HAHA [​IMG]
     
    NeverGiveUp likes this.
  7. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    & that fine to the EU goes to those effected? Or nah? Because if not, while it's fun to laugh at FaceBook, it's stifling for others to want to rise to this level of success.
     
  8. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    Security breaches are mostly avoidable with proper coding. Many user data breaches are caused by slop coding written as a marketing feature -- this is a prime example of this.

    I have worked with the back-end of the internet and with encryption protocols and I know for fact the disregard that user data has been treated with by many organizations. These *3v1L corporations* are more interested in branding their users like common cattle and offering them up as chattel to their revenue base of advertisers.

    Facebook's own developers wrote that code that got their user's data or it access control security features hacked-- 50 million users account data was exposed to compromise -- that is $32 per user account that was compromised. Not much when you think about it in those terms.

    FB is a publicly traded company worth many billions. The EU UDRP is a draconian response to massive negligence in data use and its secure storage. FB is a *grown up* business enterprise that should be held responsible. They have millions to put behind an effort and should know better.

    Soon, there will be pressure on the US Congress to enact its own version of this type of law. The US state of California has already enacted data privacy security laws that take affect in 2020.

    The writing is on the wall -- it's adapt or die time again ...
     
  9. Certified
    tyoussef

    tyoussef Moderator moderator Certified Vendor Service Manager affiliate

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    @Graybeard do you think facebook will tell people news like this ?.
     
  10. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    By this do you mean: "mia culpa! we are incompetents" :D
    No, it would crush FB stock's value :p

    No, they will pay any fine under protest and continue with their lack of concern
    [​IMG]

    And just raise their price to advertisers -- just like Google does ...
     
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  11. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    Sure, I've done enough government contracting to also know how much they value deadlines over security, & for some reason leave unqualified individuals in positions to make decisions of technical jargon they simply don't have a clue about.
     
    tyoussef likes this.
  12. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    There is already structure in place to destroy a company over HIPPA regulations, something like $15k per leaked personal information. Sadly nothing was done when the government was victim to a phishing attack, & additionally Equifax walked away unscathed. I can only assume that further development of such laws will punish corporations & individuals, & government & government contracted facilities will not beheld responsible.
     
    tyoussef likes this.
  13. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    You are missing something really big here -- Facebook was negligent as they caused the hack by their sloppy coding.

    What you are saying, perhaps in the other examples too; If I leave my door unlocked and I get robbed I am without fault ... why is there a door lock in the first place?

    The falsifying of authorization tokens is the oldest trick in the hacker's playbook after simple social engineering.

    If you want to observe how a logged in user might see your account profile -- just create a demo user account with read only permissions of data that is public only. The subject user's subscription to apps and any non public info should not have read or write authority of anyone with the exception of that user and the site's administrative accounts.

    Because the people in in IT are so lackadaisical about securing customer data I have separate bank accounts with limited funds for use for both for internet transactions and local POS terminal purchases. If those Mastercard branded cards are ever compromised by the negligence of others my losses will be limited in a worst case scenario.

    My credit cards and debit cards have been repeatedly compromised.

    The only things Facebook might have are one special prepaid credit card that has never had more than a $100 balance on it :p, my gmail name and my mobile phone number -- nothing of real concern. Facebook is a colossal waste of my time -- pretty much an idiot convention IMHO. 2 fucks not given over this really other than Facebook should be held responsible for their actions.

    If the powers that be wanted to cane Zuckerberg's ass raw in public I would pay $5.00 to watch that :D

    However, they will just take some of Facebook's money in *punishment*
    That is not 'equitable punishment' that is statutory punishment and that is how a society of laws works. Nothing is improved and there is no compensation to the victims.

    I do agree with you in principal; Facebook should be forced by the EU to pay the equivalent of $32 to every person whose data was compromised <<< that would be equitable justice.
     
  14. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    But my problem with this logic is why does the EU get money from Facebook, when it was the people that were wronged? How does EU's profit of a tangible dollar amount in any way correct the actions caused by Facebook?

    it's like party A wrongs party B, so party C profits?
     
  15. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    The EU thinks it has the right to penalize.
    What is the alternative? Major class action lawsuits where the only substantial profit does to the lawyers?
    Bottom line you cannot jail a corporation -- only its officers and only when personal malice can be proven or criminal mens rea can be proven. That's just the way it is -- right or wrong. Lawyers, guns and money -- its an old story.

    Generally, there is no malice in these hacks as the corporation claims it is also a victim of the hack -- a victim of its own stupidity. Being stupid is not against the law. Creating defective code (in this instance) is in itself not against the law.

    The EU GDPR has statutory damages as a percentage of that businesses annual revenue
    GDPR – PLANIT // LEGAL
    The EU GDPR Directive has punitive *teeth* for any business with legal lexis and assets within the EU jurisdiction.


    However, if damages, real monetary damages, can be proven -- then what occurred is a civil case I think.
    2011 California Code :: Civil Code :: DIVISION 3. OBLIGATIONS [1427 - 3272.9] :: TITLE 1.81. CUSTOMER RECORDS :: Section 1798.82
    Facebook had to make notice under California Civil Code
    2017 California Code :: Civil Code - CIV :: DIVISION 3 - OBLIGATIONS :: PART 4 - OBLIGATIONS ARISING FROM ICULAR TRANSACTIONS :: TITLE 1.8 - PERSONAL DATA :: CHAPTER 1 - Information Practices Act of 977
    There are no statutory civil penalties I see -- there are only actual damages in a case like this -- for causes of the Defendant's negligence.

    Facebook just shit on the people who entrusted it -- bottom line
     
  16. ClickWD

    ClickWD Service Manager Service Manager affiliate

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    Good thing I don't have a personal Facebook account.
     
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  17. no2pencil

    no2pencil Affiliate affiliate

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    & this is pretty much my other point. One can choose to have, or not have a FB account. One also has the ability to not use FB as their own name. I can self-subscribe to how much of my own personal information that I am willing to risk with their system. There is zero chance that I can ever get my data scrubbed from Equifax. FB gets spanked, the government earns a bunch of money, I am in no way compensated & still ill whatever side effects. In the case of Equifax... well, nothing happens. Me & my data are just screwed.
     
    ClickWD likes this.
  18. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    Well you are not alone. I too was a 'victim' of the Equifax hack. I had to replace credit cards after the Tjmax and Target breaches too. In none of those cases did I incur any financial damages however. Now my credit cards may have been compromised by a new breach at Newegg.com where I have bought computer parts for years. All the credit card data should be stored in PCI-DSS servers that are not directly facing the an internet connection so hopefully it is only some personnel data breached, e.g.; order history, email or possibly the shipping address.

    Facebook is just a clown circus to me in the bigger picture of things. If Facebook gets a smack down and some government fines I have no problem with that. Usually these days world governments are busy screwing the *little-people* When some big arrogant corporation gets ass-raped by the government penalizing (pun intended) that corporation's failure to protect the rights of the common people -- in most cases I have no problem with it.

    I can forbear my compensation from Facebook -- or accept as my pleasure seeing Facebook's torment. And hopefully, their public humiliation and market loss.

    I am going to be attempting to build a payment wallet with Stellar and Lumens ( the LUX digital currency ) and Hyperledger applications using blockchain for ecommerce applications. Data security will be a paramount function built in in the development from the start. I believe secure financial transaction will be a major adoption curve driver from now on because of these type security breaches becoming so common.
     
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  19. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    TexasSteve - 3 Oct 2018 11:15 AM
    because of the success, many are forced as unwilling participants to use the facebook platform. I resist social media and HOPE the fines are Significant. Unless they are, american companies will continue to minimize the true importance of data protection and their responsibility to the public.

    ^^^ well said ;)
    Facebook GDPR fate uncertain following data breach

     
  20. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith Affiliate affiliate

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    What makes me wonder about this is--- if you have FB do you ever get those automated messages stating FB will be starting to charge soon or some non sense like that? I mean I and other people have been getting those messages for a while now, so maybe facebook "hacked" them selfs to come back to actually charge everyone with an account by using some sort of excuse as " With your subscription fee we can continue to improve or security platform to serve you and others better"........................... hummm i dunno i'm just thinking out load lol
     
  21. Graybeard

    Graybeard Well-Known Member affiliate

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    Bandwidth is cheap compared to the value of the user base they can sell advertising to ... I think Facebook will remain free so long as they can sell marketing to their *cattle* <<<Facebook users :p

    The same would apply to most Google products ;)
     
    Matt Smith likes this.
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